Revocation – The Outer Ones

Nothing can compare to the nuttiness that can be tech death. Blast beats plus virtuoso riffing is simply candy to the ears. The only problem, if it can even really be defined that way, is that tech death is rarely “dirty”. I mean that in the way that old school death metal or thrash bands can be dirty. Playing things a little looser and dialing back on the production qualities while also turning up the distortion is very rarely in the playbook for tech death bands. Fortunately, the fans of dirt have Revocation, a band that consistently blurs the lines between thrash and technical death metal. The Outer Ones is a great example that bands can play things a little loose while also being technical masters of their instruments.

The Anatomy Of – Etherius

To be honest, this list makes me feel happy because it mentions Iced Earth’s Something Wicked This Way Comes. Early Iced Earth is criminally underrated in the contemporary progressive/power/heavy metal community; while their later works leave a lot to be desired, their early albums are downright incredible. Add more common, but still excellent choices like Dream Theater and Metallica to this list and you’ve got yourself one sweet Anatomy!

Hey! Listen to Angelus Apatrida!

Angelus Apatrida have been one of the most consistently impressive thrash bands of the modern era. They’ve managed to establish a strong cult following, but the Spanish quartet have hardly received the kind of exposure given to American acts like Havok, Warbringer or Municipal Waste. Nevertheless, last May saw the…

135 – Dog Of Raw

This week, regular co-host Cody joins us for a whole lot of news. And of course I immediately derail it by trolling him. But then, we discuss: Revolver’s 20 essential nu-metal albums list, new music from Dol Ammad, Within the Ruins, Skyharbor, Monuments, Metal Allegiance, Doug Moore of Pyrrhon performing with an orchestra, Neckbeard Deathcamp, Science of Disorder, Voivod, Beyond Creation, Geist of Trinity, and Behemoth. Also Testament’s new cryptocurrency. Then we do a cool people section about some games, movies, and Cody’s vegetarian diet. Enjoy!

Half-Life: Bleeding Through

If you’re not convinced that we’re currently deep in the middle of the metalcore resurgence, then the simple fact that tomorrow sees the release of the first Bleeding Through record in over six-years should lay those doubts to rest. You’ll have to wait until then for Jordan to tell you just how good Love Will Kill All is, but this seems like as good an opportunity as ever to look back upon the career of a band who were foundational to the dominant heavy metal movement of the new millennium, and who certainly carved out a strong following for themselves, yet who—in retrospect—feel somewhat overlooked compared to their peers, especially considering the sheer quality and consistency of their output. You might say, that their genre’s Testament and, if new single “Fade Into The Ash” is anything to go by, it would also seem they haven’t lost any of that edge in the more than half-decade interim.

Dispatches from the Port Phillip Bay Area – Into the Pit of Australian Thrash Metal

Due to the way we’ve decided to divide up the time zones, correspondence with an international audience from the humble southern continent of Australia often feels akin to looking into the past. Yet, despite this perceived futurism, Australian culture often trails its American and European counterparts by some distance. So it is that, while the northern thrash revival has come and (more-or-less) gone, the Australian metal scene is currently experiencing the biggest genre boom it has undergone since thrash metal originally emerged in the mid ‘80s. Back then, we brought our own quality acts to the fold, most notably in the form(s) of Mortal Sin and Hobbs Angel of Death, and the Allegiance in the ’90s. Yet, while the style had effectively remained dormant since then, the last five-to-ten years have seen an explosion in the amount of world-class thrash metal bands to have emerged from these southern shores.