Gaerea – Unsettling Whispers

Black metal is formulaic in nature. The tropes of the genre have been recycled and reused on an endless spectrum. Bands have been integrating strange things into the style for a long time, yearning to breathe life into the cold and desolate sound beyond the standard helping of meat and…

EXCLUSIVE PREMIERE: Something new with Poney’s “Pagan Nouveau”

For the uninitiated, Poney’s unique brand of rock fury brings together uncommon company in ways that always manage to reconcile themselves. Intricate arrangements are balanced with tight songwriting, hooks weasel their way into both the gnarliest and most spacious of places, and the intersection of sludge, post-hardcore, and pop becomes…

Doomsday // April 2018

Greetings, heaviest of Heavy Bloggers! Welcome to Doomsday, our monthly roundup of some of the most noteworthy releases in the doom world released over the past month. April was a true sleeper month for doom as some of the most titanic releases were saved for the month’s back half. Who knows? Maybe there was even a surprise release last week you heard about perhaps? With this much to bang our heads to, we better get straight to it. Enough chatter! Grab your earplugs, it’s doomsday.

Norska – Too Many Winters

“Personality” is a word that’s not frequently thrown around when discussing doom or sludge metal. We’re often (and justifiably) engrossed in domineering riffage, thundering drums, and the bellowing growls of some dude shrouded in beard. But no matter how much you love the stuff, as they say, first impressions are…

Hypergiant – Father Sky

The early 2000s brought us a wealth of riff-worshipping, bone-quaking goodness  – what has essentially become the foundation of many current doom, stoner, and sludge metal acts. Bands like Mastodon, High on Fire, and Baroness expanded upon the standard set by metal’s forefathers with more progressive tendencies, expansive arrangements, fiercer presentation, technically demanding performances, and (presumably) better strains of grass. At the same time (and likely benefitting from the same improved… *ahem* genetics), there was also a bubble of traditionalists like The Sword, Wolfmother, and Saviours who made the case that a more conventional approach was worth revisiting, reinvigorating classic sounds for a new generation of headbangers. It’s from this very specific nexus that Australia’s Hypergiant explode, harkening back to familiar territories on both sides of this early-00s coin.