Inanimate Existence – Underneath a Melting Sky

Sometimes you have to take a step back to move forward. Counter intuitive, yes. But as I’ve progressed through life I’ve found this to be true. Perhaps related to a career, where one has to go back to the drawing board to re-learn concepts long forgotten from some slept-through college lecture. Or in one’s personal life, where sometimes rehashing old wounds is the only way to progress past them. Music often falls into this same trajectory. Sometimes the alteration of sound works against a band rather than for them. While I am an enormous proponent of progression and change in music, how a band decides to engage in new musical and thematic concepts matters. Some do it right (Artificial Brain, Ingurgitating Oblivion), while some do not (latter-day Metallica, Morbid Angel). Yes, the parenthetical suggestions used to prove my point here are infinitely debatable, but I would make the argument that not all of these bands’ forays into uncharted territory worked in their favor. So it’s nice to see a band keep to their progressive trajectory, but pull from their back catalog elements that make their sound more enjoyable. Inanimate Existence are one of those bands, and with Underneath a Melting Sky have further perfected their sound by staying adventurous while simultaneously plundering the most essential elements of their past records.

To Prequel or Not? Cynic Provides the Missing Link and has their Revenge of the Sith Moment

Cynic is a legendary and influential band. Since news that drummer and founding member Sean Reinert has left the band, many fans have wondered what is on the horizon, if anything. While there’s still no word on new music from co-founder and guitarist/vocalist Paul Masvidal (who vowed to continue the band), late last year, an announcement from the realm of music archaeologists got nerd minds spinning. Uroboric Forms: The Complete Demo Collection would be released and fans would maybe get some answers about how the hell Cynic went from being in Death (which was basically a Chuck Schuldiner backing gig) to dropping an absolutely groundbreaking gem in Focus. Southern Florida in the late 80s and early 90s is hallowed ground in extreme metal. Would Uroboric Forms rewrite the narrative?

Persefone – Aathma

Persefone are no newcomers to metal, but they do stand in the shadow of their previous release, The Spiritual Migration. This album, lauded by many (including us) as a masterpiece of modern progressive metal, completely destroys any but two or three other releases in its own genre. It was, and remains, fresh, surprising, intimately familiar and yet, somehow, irreverent at the same time. Therefore, when the band announced a crowdfunding campaign for its follow up last year, titled Aathma, breaths were held across the community. Can Persefone achieve one of the two options above? That is, can they either recreate something close to The Spiritual Migration or, failing that, depart from that monumental creation into something just as good?

Hey! Listen to Paul Ozz

One man bands, am I right? They seem to be all the rage in the metal community in the past five years or so. This is due to a multiplicity of factors, not least of which are the Internet’s ease of use and the growing accessibility of recording gear and knowledge. Often times, this creates music which is obviously technically able but lacks the self-criticism you get when a group of people work on something together. However, it also sometimes allows strong visions that would otherwise remain silent to express themselves. With that in mind, I pitch you Paul Ozz. Going the arduous route of simply sending us an email and hoping it won’t get lost in the literally tens of thousands of emails we get, Paul is another fruit of the precious tree that is the blog inbox.

Binary Code’s Jesse Zuretti Opens Up About Moonsblood‘s Long History In New Video

We’ve written recently about NJ progressive death metal outfit Binary Code and their upcoming sophomore album Moonsblood, which will be their first release in 6 years. Anyone who’s followed the band closely in the past few years knows that the long gap between releases was anything but intentional, but up until recently they’ve been almost completely mute about the causes of the delay. Shortly after Binary Code guitarist and songwriter Jesse Zuretti began dropping hints online that their new album would officially be coming this year, I asked to sit down with him and talk through what exactly happened, what got them to this place, and what fans can expect now.