Death’s Door – September 2018

Given the nature of these columns, it might seem counterintuitive to include a subpar album among our selections for the month. That’s why I’ve accosted this intro spot to say my piece about Deicide, and specifically their latest album Overtures of Blasphemy. Coincidentally, the same month these Floridian antitheists released their 12th…

Release Day Roundup – 9/7/18

Each month, we always seem to come to the same conclusion when it comes to our Editors’ Picks column: Friday release days open the floodgates and unleash a seemingly endless stream of quality new music. But while some of our Editors and Contributors sit down gleefully each week to dive into this newly stocked treasure…

Krisiun – Scourge of the Enthroned

There are many paths towards the status of veteran in death metal. Some bands, like Mithras who recently came back to us, release classic albums and then disappear only to resurface years later, bearing the gospel of the riff once again. Others are second/third/fourth wave mavericks, incessantly dragging death metal into modernity like Misery Index. But there’s also a rare kind of beast out there, the death metal band that’s been around since the genre’s heyday and has also ceased to stop working, constantly releasing new music. In that category, few bands have the primacy of pedigree that Krisiun enjoy.

134 – Getting Stale

I promise this episode title isn’t about the podcast itself. I think this is one of the better episodes in a while, in fact! We discuss a bunch of new music, including Krisiun, Epica, Born of Osiris, Anaal Nathrakh, Daron Malakian and Scars on Broadway, and Erra. Then some happenings, like Kvelertak getting a new vocalist, Matt Tuck of Bullet For My Valentine and his terrible hot take, The Ocean (not to be confused with Oceano, Eden) working on a double album, Eden’s Alkaloid prognotes, and me meeting a fellow metal musician and discovering his awesome band Cartilage. Along the ride, we discuss how modern production is ruining death metal (I promise it’s not “old man yells at clouds”), the DC cinematic universe, and more. Also, we do cool people time with Enter the Gungeon and Middle Earth: Shadow of War DLC, and me waxing poetic about puzzle games, including The Spectrum Retreat, (The) Portal 1/2, The Talos Principle, The Witness, The Swapper and more. Enjoy!

Cut Up – Wherever They May Rot

Sweden has quite the reputation for crusty, gruff death metal. Familiar legends like Entombed and Dismember are eternally inscribed in the brains of metalheads but they might not be as well acquainted with Vomitory, a band with a string of brutal, gory minor classics in the 1990s. Before breaking up 2011, Vomitory was signed to Metal Blade Records, so they aren’t exactly unsung heroes. Nonetheless, they are certainly still overshadowed by their more famous fellow countrymen. Two long time members of Vomitory, drummer Tobias Gustafsson and bassist/vocalist Erik Rundqvist, returned in 2015 with a new project, Cut Up, who are now releasing their sophomore album.

Paul Mazurkiewicz of Cannibal Corpse: The Heavy Blog Is Heavy Interview

Cannibal Corpse are the most famous death metal band in the world for a reason. They’ve been pummeling the metal scene since the late 80s and have been unrelenting in their quest for the death metal crown, which they have carried for the better part of their career. They are the quintessential example of how death metal should sound, be played, and the attitudes they should have. SO I was truly excited to finally get to sit down with Paul and talk to him about all things death metal, and also about the state of the scene, how he likes his eggs, and more!

SHOW REVIEW: Summer Slaughter 2016 – July 30 @ The Palladium, Worcester, MA

Despite my criticism of last year’s Summer Slaughter Tour, I’m actually a fan of several past lineups and the bands they boasted. My first Summer Slaughter back in 2014 had an absolutely monstrous billing which featured some of my all-time favorite death metal bands (Morbid Angel and Dying Fetus in particular). This year’s lineup bore a similarly stacked lineup that allowed me to overlook some of my main criticisms with the tour, being a repetitive selection and – for the Worcester date specifically – an absurd number of opening acts that are relegated to an upper stage removed from the main performances. Unfortunately, these issues became the least of my worries, as a combination of persistent sound issues and band-specific criticisms detracted from an initially promising roster.

Krisiun – Forged In Fury

One doesn’t need to search extensively within the metal world to find examples of successful family cooperation. The Duplantier brothers from Gorjira and the Weaver brothers from Wolves In the Throne Room are just two examples that come to mind. Another case of brotherly cooperation is the lads in Krisiun,…