Hey! Listen to The Grey!

As a general rule, a metal band that takes the decision to remain instrumental is more likely to be a proggy or mathy affair. When listening to them, it’s more common to find oneself swaying to twinkly explorations or twitching to movable-feast time signatures than outright headbanging. But rules are meant…

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Dub Trio – The Shape of Dub to Come

Eight years is an uncommonly long wait between chapters in any band’s story, but Dub Trio have always had a lassez-faire attitude to convention. Indeed, you can count the number of instrumental three-pieces forging a hybrid of heavy garage rock and experimental dub reggae on the fingers of one finger. Even…

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Concert Review – Progfest 2019

Australia’s Progfest has been steadily gaining in size and popularity, in the decade since its inception. Just three years ago the touring festival consisted entirely of local acts. However, 2018 saw the bill expand to include Norway’s Leprous as international headliners, and the festival managed triple that number this year—drafting…

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Disco Loadout: 2018 In Review

Four years ago, I started to keep a complete list of every band I saw. Three years ago, I began kicking myself for not starting that childishly simple task sooner. Never mind. At least I can tell you exactly what I got up to this year – with one important caveat. A…

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Rapidfire Review: Karma To Burn/Ghost Horizon

West Virginia’s Karma to Burn may have been lurking in the hazy underground of stoner rock in several different forms since the 90s, but they’ve never seemed to make the same impact on listeners than some of the other projects they’ve been associated with (most notably Kyuss). Though their tenacious aggression and uncompromising instrumental sound may serve as a decent background to a beer-soaked evening with some good friends, the band’s latest EP Mountain Czar simply doesn’t take enough risks to really stand out from the now overcrowded world of sludgy hard rock

Joining it is Ghost Horizon. This isn’t a type of music that’s easily contained in such bite-sized pieces; it becomes all too easy to lose the emotional weight and feeling of a journey that’s crucial to this genre’s sound. Groups like Wolves In The Throne Room and Agalloch do not typically write songs which lie under the 5-minute mark (as all three of the songs here do). Although it’s certainly not impossible or unthinkable that such a short EP could contain all of the qualities necessary to make this genre work, Astral Possession just… doesn’t. Put bluntly, these songs just are not fully fleshed out enough to have any sort of decent effect on the listener.