Ne Obliviscaris – Urn

Expectation can be a curious beast. From a band’s perspective it can drive the wheels of excitement accompanying the build-up to a new release, pushing them to new heights and allowing them to reach wider audiences. Yet, it can also hang over them like a pestilence, crippling them with fear…

Dodecahedron – Kwintessens

It seems to come up every time a new record pops up within the niche that Gorguts, Portal, and Deathspell Omega built; there’s not much room left in the sphere of dissonant, atmospheric, and abstract extreme metal due to the limitations of the style. Murk chords and blastbeats can only carry a record for so long (as we’ve seen with first casualty Plebeian Grandstand), and the novelty is wearing thin. Bands such as Ulcerate and Sunless thrive on the death metal end of the spectrum by offering depth and creative riffing, but black metal has yet to have much success in challenging Deathspell’s monolithic reach. Dutch black metallers Dodecahedron are the best bet at carrying the torch into new territory, whose debut five years ago came (from seemingly) out of nowhere and quickly reached cult status. The group, who has significant ties to prog-fusion group Exivious, takes a more overtly progressive and technical approach to the sound, and therefore, into further extremities.

PREMIERE: Our Oceans Release Music Video For “Tangled”

“Tangled” depicts what is unfortunately all too familiar a feeling for many of us: that of the intense heartbreak that follows similarly intense love, and the difficulty of coping with it as the days go by. To be trapped within the confines of nostalgia, dreams, and longing, with no apparent way out — spending sleepless nights trying to rationalize what has come to pass, struggling to let go of it in the first place.

EXCLUSIVE PREMIERE: Mammoth Hypnotize With “The Acclimation of Sedation”

Just a few days ago, Eden extolled the virtues of Los Angeles-based Mammoth’s upcoming album Deviations, talking at length about how the three-piece beautifully melds progressive rock with jazz fusion in a thrilling, exuberant fashion. Although any old band might let that blend speak for itself, Mammoth inject their sound with a healthy helping of sheer…

What Heavy Blog Is Really Listening To – 7/29/16

For those who missed our last installment, We post biweekly updates covering what the staff at Heavy Blog have been spinning. Given the amount of time we spend on the site telling you about music that does not fall neatly into the confines of conventional “metal,” it should come as no surprise that many of us on staff have pretty eclectic tastes that range far outside of metal and heavy things. We can’t post about all of them at length here, but we can at least let you know what we’re actually listening to. For those that would like to participate as well (and please do) can drop a 3X3 in the comments, which can be made with tapmusic.netthrough your last.fm account, or create it manually with topsters.net. Also, consider these posts open threads to talk about pretty much anything music-related. We love hearing all of your thoughts on this stuff and love being able to nerd out along with all of you.

Connecting the Dots: Cynic

Welcome to another edition of Connecting the Dots, and today we will be focusing on one of the most influential extreme metal bands of all time – none other than the legendary Cynic! Evidence of their influence is clear from the artists we speak with, for members of Ne Obliviscaris,…

Fire! Orchestra – Ritual (Can This Even Be Called Music?)

To understand what Fire! Orchestra is, we have to first know whence it came. And that would be the Fire! trio. Since 2009, Fire! is comprised of mastermind, saxophonist, and keyboardist Mats Gustafsson (who is widely known as a great jazz musician, especially for his improvisational style), bassist Johan Berthling, and drummer Andreas Werliin, both of whom are also known in the Swedish jazz scene for their work in other bands. As of today, they have released three full-length albums on their own, as well as two collaborations – one with Oren Ambarchi (In the Mouth a Hand), and one with Jim O’Rourke (Unreleased?) – plus a couple of EPs. They gained further recognition by playing fresh, inspired and energetic avant-jazz, getting better with each subsequent album, culminating with their 2016 release, She Sleeps, She Sleeps. Back in 2012, they had the idea of expanding their formula with the addition of an orchestra. Now with nineteen musicians instead of three, there was much more space for experimentation and variety, although there was already a lot of both in their simpler format.