Trivium – The Sin and the Sentence

The conversation surrounding Trivium is a pretty loaded one. A band that instantly rose to fame at a young age with music defined by talent and broad appeal is bound to attract some ire. Every subsequent album they’ve put out has changed their sound to some extent, and sometimes those changes were controversial among fans and the general audience alike. How does a band react to this? By just doing what they want. Trivium have soldiered on, releasing albums and touring consistently, and they have always found an audience. Yet, since 2008’s masterpiece Shogun, it felt like nothing they did really compared. Enter The Sin and the Sentence. This album isn’t Shogun 2.0, but it’s its own beast, and it signals a new paradigm for the band. After nearly a decade of musical soul searching by the band, it finally feels like they’ve reached a point of equilibrium, a new sound that fully utilizes their diverse sets of talents. Finally, the band’s potential is fully realized again.

47 – Might As Well Call Us SeasonOfMistCast

Yeah, we love pretty much everything on Season of Mist. So what? This week we talk about new music from Thy Catafalque, Brain Drill, Opeth, Snowy Shaw, SHOKRAN (teaser here), Noctem, Victor Wooten’s new band Octavision, Oxiplegatz, Exotype, Sleep Token, Hannes Grossmann, and Watchtower. Then we go over some news, like Darkthrone’s Fenriz getting elected for city council, Persefone announcing a new album, Sikth reissuing Death of a Dead Day, and Enslaved announcing a rarities collection. Then we discuss two albums that have been on our minds: Insomnium’s Winter’s Gate, and Misery Index’s The Killing Gods. We introduce our new segment, “Underrated release highlight of the week” – this week we talk about Arkona’s Yav. Finally, we talk about our process for discovering and ingesting new music. Enjoy! Also cool people time has some cool stuff.

Infinite Density – Recollapse of the Universe

Another month, another Ne Obliviscaris side project. Just a few short months after Vipassi released their amazing debut EP Śūnyatā, multi-instrumentalist Brendan Brown, best known as the bass player in the aforementioned bands, has put the finishing touches on the debut LP of his solo project Infinite Density. A staggering nine years in the making, this album saw Brown compose and track each instrument. As mentioned in his initial album announcement, one reason for the length of time taken in releasing this record is because Brown has spent much of that time honing his guitar skills to a level where he could actually play the songs he had written. That moment is finally upon us as he enlists Ben Boyle (Hadal Maw, A Million Dead Birds Laughing, Vipassi) on vocals to release a technical death metal album in the vein of acclaimed acts such as Wormed and Inanimate Existence.

37 – Apples and GOATs

It’s the fourth of July, and I’m too caught up in festivities to type up a proper podcast post. Why do I spoil the contents of each episode every week anyway? Oh, right, for SEO purposes, and some people actually read these posts instead of diving straight to the cast. Well, I’ll just list off the relevant artist names and such after the jump with links, and you can listen to the cast for context! Oh, we also talk about our favorite albums of all time. No big deal.

35 – Selling Out

We did it! We finally sold out. How? Find out here. In the meantime, we have some news and discussions. Whitechapel’s new album is streaming, Opeth and In Flames sign to Nuclear Blast (with the latter announcing a new album), we listened to and opined on the upcoming Pain of Salvation rerelease and Black Crown Initiate album, new music from Volumes and Brain Drill, Pyrexia’s vocalist killing people, Joey Jordison’s explanation of why he left Slipknot, new album announcement by Sahg, tour news including Pyrrhon, Plebeian Grandstand, Skrillex and Guns and Roses. Then we do a balls deep on Gojira, and also talk about the reception to Eden’s review of Magma and a general discussion about the state of the podcast. Enjoy!

Rings of Saturn – Dingir

For a band so young, Rings of Saturn have become strangely notorious in such a short career. The last thing the already controversial genre of tech-death needed was a band with roots in deathcore born out of the technological age in both digitally processed aesthetic and a chaotic, unfiltered attitude. In that regard, Rings of Saturn are a product of their environment, aligning themselves firmly on the overindulgent side of the genre of technical death metal (a la Viraemia and Brain Drill) for their debut album, Embryonic Anomaly. It’s easy to see how a band as extreme as Rings of Saturn can be so polarizing at first glance.

Metal Production: How Do You Like It?

Production styles seem to stir up significant differences of opinion amongst metal fans. Of course, every band and album has its own somewhat unique flavor, but I’d like to discuss the two biggest opposite extremes in metal production: sludginess and gloss. Let’s take a look at some tunes that exemplify…