Djent Was A Genre Full Of Great Debuts And Little Else

Djent had an explosive entrance into the world of heavy music, around the start of the decade. It was a truly exciting occurrence, with first-wave acts like Periphery, Animals As Leaders and Cloudkicker filtering the technically-driven progressive sound of acts like Meshuggah, Sikth, and those of the budding “Sumeriancore” movement, into something  altogether more accessible, while still retaining much of their forebears’ technical and progressive edge. Yet, like most new sub-genres, djent quickly devolved into pastiche and gave way to over saturation—perhaps a little bit quicker than most. Djent, it seems, has had a propperly ballistic trajectory, and—in 2017—as its momentum trails off, it’s hard to get excited about this once-promising phenomenon.

Hey! Listen To Reptilian Civilian!

Do you enjoy no nonsense, riff filled death metal? Do you like sub bass drops and beat downs? Do you also believe that the ruling class of the world is made up of scaly, lizard people? Well, even if you only answered yes to the first two questions, you will almost definitely enjoy the devilishly wholesome offerings of Brisbane’s Reptilian Civilian. Five guys hanging out and playing sick death metal with plenty of tech and slam, these chaps deliver on the promise of every tag you’ll find their music under on Bandcamp. Slamming brutal technical deathcore with a global conspiracy theme? Yes, this will be fine.

The Rise And Fall And Rise Of Born Of Osiris

“Sumeriancore” was an interesting genre. A highly specific brand of progressive metalcore that coincided with the rise of Sumerian Records, lead by prominent bands on that label, it was very popular for a few years and then dissolved into djent shortly after. Born of Osiris were at the forefront of this, if not the main driving force. Being part of the original “big 4” of the genre along with label mates Veil of Maya, The Faceless and After the Burial, they’ve inspired many other artists and headlined many tours. They’ve had some wildly acclaimed albums, and some that are borderline ridiculed. A decade after their debut, where are they now? Where is the genre? And what’s their future? That’s what we’re here to discuss today.

Editors’ Picks: February 2017

2017 is firing on all barrels. After an incredible January, containing several potential Album of the Year contenders, February further solidifies our firm belief that we are in the Golden Age of metal. Of course, this list contains more than metal, as befits Heavy Blog today, but just look how…

What Heavy Blog Is Really Listening To – 3/3/17

For those who missed our last installment, We post biweekly updates covering what the staff at Heavy Blog have been spinning. Given the amount of time we spend on the site telling you about music that does not fall neatly into the confines of conventional “metal,” it should come as no surprise that many of us on staff have pretty eclectic tastes that range far outside of metal and heavy things. We can’t post about all of them at length here, but we can at least let you know what we’re actually listening to. For those that would like to participate as well (and please do) can drop a 3X3 in the comments, which can be made with tapmusic.net through your last.fm account, or create it manually with topsters.net. Also, consider these posts open threads to talk about pretty much anything music-related. We love hearing all of your thoughts on this stuff and love being able to nerd out along with all of you.

69 – Salt

  Hey! This week we discuss stuff. Stuff like Marduk’s show getting cancelled because they’re thought to be nazis, Wintersun’s neverending shenanigans, Suicide Silence’s new album. Yeah, this episode is called “Salt”. But we also talk about Dimmu Borgir releasing a live DVD and a new album, Gruesome being a…

68 – Cynical And Technical

Eden has abandoned us yet again, so, statistically speaking, we’ll probably have Ahmed or Nick with us this week. I guess you’ll have to guess whom’st’d’ve!?

We talk about some news/drama, new releases, and mainstream-metal interactions. Namely Dallas Toler-Wade leaving Nile and getting replaced with Brian of Enthean. Then Cynic drama following the recent release of their demo tapes. Then some new music. Galactic Empire (and Anchorhead), Dodecahedron, Artificial Brain, Body Count, Linkin Park, Reaping Asmodeia, Ogarya, John Frum, Born of Osiris. Of course we talk about the dude singing Necrophagist at Canadian Voice. And the Grammys, namely Megadeth and Metallica.

Post-recording note: New Nile lineup is awesome. I’m stoked now. That fist bump was amazing.

65 – Time II Stop Jari

A week full of fun times! We talk about Wintersun shenanigans yet again, Tidal shenanigans, Bandcamp successes, then we talk about new music or content from a bunch of artists. Opeth, Leprous with Ihsahn, Psykup, Betraying the Martyrs, Born of Osiris, Dodecahedron, Disperse, Virvum, Six Feet Under, Arch Enemy, Quasarborn, Oni, Mayhem, Sunless, Pallbearer, Adam Young, and Mastodon. We also talk about this list of power metal in 2016, some cool people stuff. Also, take a look at this gofundme of a victim of crowdkilling (gfm link here) at a Code Orange show, and check out me and Eden’s new role-playing podcast!

63 – How Is This Train Still Going?

Do you like deathcore? My condolences. Oh, I’m just kidding. There are some good bands in the genre. On an unrelated note (truly), there’s a new Within the Ruins song and a playthrough as well. Also, Born of Osiris are redoing their debut plus a new song, and the new Aversions Crown is great. We also discovered some more Season of Mist stuff, namely Replacire. Nergal of Behemoth’s new project Me And That Man is, well, interesting. Then we get incensed about people getting incensed about bands applying new funding and marketing models. Then we discuss why vocals are the main off-putting thing for a lot of people, and on that note, how avant-garde bands aren’t really that avant-garde. Enjoy!

Endless Sacrifice – Suffering, Metal, and Identity Politics, Part 2

Welcome back to Endless Sacrifice, our ongoing look at the role which the ideal of suffering plays within metal. Our opening article focused on content analysis, taking a look at the ideal of suffering as it comes across from the content which metal is concerned with. Lyrics provided a fertile ground for exploration because they are the standard which music raises in order to convey its meaning (although we saw that a grain of salt is indeed needed when considering them). Today we discuss the instrumental side of things. Approaching this topic was not the easiest thing to do at first; after all, how does one relate strictly musical content to the concept of suffering within metal? Where to even begin, when what one gleans from a certain musical moment is nowhere near objective? What this apparent divide necessitates instead is a re-framing of the question itself.