Heavy Blog Guest List – Dreadnought’s Top 10 Albums of 2017

Editor’s note: Yes, it’s that time of the year again! While our own Album of the Year list is coming down the line, we have a ton of end of year content for you. Over the next two weeks, we’ll be exploring 2017 in various of ways: through curated summaries for specific genres, editorials on specific phenomena we found interesting and, of course, guest lists! This time around, we have one of the most exciting bands currently in operation: Dreadnought! Hailing from the by-now vaunted scene from Denver, Dreadnought traffic in the areas around doom metal, introducing influences from black metal, folk rock and progressive rock. Their albums are true monoliths of complexity and melody, with this year’s A Wake in Sacred Waves denoting somewhat of a high water mark for any bands wishing to work in the space of experimental doom. Their list is as diverse as you would expect; from the jazz styling of none other than the legendary Thundercat, through the blackened wastes of Ruins of Beverast and all the way back to the off-kilter musings of Bjork, their list draws from as many directions as their music does.

So, without wasting any more of your time, here is Dreadnought’s Top 10 albums for 2017!

Úlfur – Arborescence

No genre has experienced a more distinct shift in its cultural purpose than classical music. What was once the sole form of musical expression in Western culture has been largely relegated to specific roles in society. Modern classical certainly hasn’t lost any of its esteem, but in terms of popular…

Land Animals: How Bent Knee’s Fierce Eclecticism, Emotional Honesty, And Work Ethic Are Paying Off

I am at Rough Trade in Williamsburg, Brooklyn for the Boston-based art-rock band Bent Knee, both to interview them and to see them play live for my first time. I would love to say that I had been following the band for years and have already seen them a handful of times, but somehow their head-spinning mixture of heavy-hitting Faith No More energy, proggy theatrics, and off-kilter pop/rock experimentations somewhere between Björk and St. Vincent had escaped me until only just this year when a fellow Heavy Blogger introduced me to them through their 2014 sophomore LP Shiny Eyed Babies. Upon hearing tracks like “Way Too Long” and “Being Human” I was instantly hooked. The blend of jazz influences with the bite of heavy rock and metal, extensive incorporation of violin, and the powerful siren sounds of vocalist Courtney Swain were more than enough to grab my attention, and I quickly did all I could to catch myself up on their (at the time) 3 albums.