These posts are written by: Eden Kupermintz

The Anatomy Of – Netherlands

Honestly, I knew I was in for a wild ride when I asked Netherlands to write this post for us. If you’re still unaware of these guys, let me introduce you: they’re from Brooklyn. They make a kind of poppy sludge that takes Torche and feeds it through a grinder, belching it out some sort of neon pink, noxious and incredibly groovy weirdness from the other side. They’re also don’t take themselves too seriously, infusing plenty of their music and its surrounding aesthetics with lots of self-deprecating and society-deprecating humor. Oh, and they’re also incredibly hard-working, having released an album and an EP in the last two years and now gearing up for Black Gaia, which comes out on the 24th of August and a tour with none other than legends Mastodon and Dinosaur Jr. You can head on over to their site for dates and a pre-order thing.

The Anatomy Of – Ancestors

I can’t rightfully convey to you how excited I am to be running this post; Ancestors are one of my all time favorite bands. And boy did Ancestors deliver; their upcoming Suspended in Reflections is amazing. But we’ll take more about that album later, since my review is going live today. While you wait for that, we have a very special and unique The Anatomy Of post for you. It happens to feature one of my other all time favorite albums and a bunch of other amazing picks straight from the mouth of Justin Maranga, the guitarist and vocalist for the band (one of them, at least). So head on over to the jump to get acquainted with what makes one of the best progressive doom bands tick and, for the love of god, listen to Ancestors.

Hey! Listen to Andy Hauck!

The saddest thing about progressive music is how much of it sounds the same; in a genre that has experimentation and innovation baked into it, you’d expect to find more people taking risks. Alas, the tropes of the genre have solidified well and good, pretty much staying the same as they were at the end of the 90’s, when the genre had its heyday. Nowadays, a lot of the interesting stuff has been excised from progressive metal and into other genres; it’s almost as if, once you reach some point of innovation, you find that you’ve moved on from the genre. That’s why it was so refreshing for me to find out about Andy Hauck, a musician from Nevada, of all places. His take on progressive metal draws a lot of inspiration from artists like Devin Townsend and Periphery, channeling plenty of modern progressive metal into his sound.

The Dark Third – Even As the Light Grows

Here’s the thing about writing reviews: it’s a constant act of parsing. What you’re trying to do when writing a review is to take something that has many elements which are either impossible to utter because of their elusive nature of just very, very hard to put into words because they’re so complex and subtle. Often times, the tools we have at our disposal (like genres, structures, post layouts and more) do a good enough job of letting us do just that and write a review. But sometimes it’s exceptionally hard. This usually happens when you’re dealing with ambitious albums, works of music which attempt to approach many issues at once or tackle one issues from multiple directions. If the music is also varied and composed of many parts then you’re in for even more of a challenge.