These posts are written by: Colin Kauffman

Promises Kept: How Oathbreaker Have Raised The Bar for Post-Black Metal

Today’s musical landscape moves and changes faster than ever before, aided largely by the internet and social media. As such, new genres of music evolve at a far more rapid pace than they ever did in the pre-internet Dark Times. Post-black metal is one such relatively young and nascent genre, and it’s already seen a significant amount of creative innovation and commercial success.

Candiria – While They Were Sleeping

Brooklyn, New York’s genre-defying act Candiria have been away for a while, their last album being the 2009’s Kiss The Lie. Far from resting on their laurels in the interim, however, the band have been busy, with several lineup changes, as well as playing their first live show in NYC in a decade at Webster Hall in January of 2015. Now, in late 2016, we finally have the latest release from the band, While They Were Sleeping, in our hands, and despite a couple of small missteps, it was well worth the long wait.

PREMIERE: Listen to Wvrm’s new track Sleep Paralysis

Greenville, South Carolina’s Wvrm are one of the rising stars of American Grind, with 2014’s Swarm Sound being a highlight of the genre that year, a fantastic record that blended grindcore with noise, doom and sludge elements. Now, in 2016, the band are preparing for the release of their new album, entitled Heartache, and Heavy Blog has the privilege of premiering their new song, “Sleep Paralysis”. Blurring the line between grind and doom, the track is over five minutes of unapologetic heaviness that doesn’t let up for a moment. Head on down below for your first, jarring taste of what these guys have planned for us this year.

Car Bomb – Meta

Adversity and struggle are the genesis of a significant amount of great art, and Long Island mathcore band Car Bomb are no exception. Whether it’s touring and playing shows relentlessly and constantly, as seen in their excellent documentary [Why_You_Do_This], or losing the majority of their gear and rehearsal space in a flood, Car Bomb are the poster children for authentic, working class modern metal. 2012’s second full length album w^w^^w^w was a masterclass in weird, angular mathcore, and now, after an agonizing four year wait and much teasing, the band have released it’s follow up, entitled Meta. Can it live up to the acclaim and hype? Could it possibly be better than w^w^^w^w?

Mick Gordon’s Work Spells DOOM For Traditional Soundtracks

Earlier this year, iD Software released the newest game in the storied Doom series, and despite negative reception to early builds of the game, the final product turned out to be the most entertaining and bad-ass shooter in years. According to the developers, the final build of the game was inspired by “Huge demons, fast movement, big fucking guns and metal” and it certainly shows. That design philosophy extends to the incredible soundtrack that goes a long way towards selling the whole aesthetic. Bringing back the talent of Australian composer Mick Gordon, who also did the soundtrack for the excellent Wolfenstein: The New Order and season one of Microsoft’s rebooted Killer Instinct, Doom’s soundtrack, officially (finally) released yesterday. It’s over 2 hours of grooving metallic riffs and pounding industrial/electronic elements blended together so seamlessly you’ll wonder why it hasn’t ever been done this well before.

Hey! Listen to Embers!

It’s always a little disheartening to only discover a band after they’ve broken up, and even more so when the band’s body of work is as small as Embers’ is. Consisting of little more than an EP, a split, and a full length LP, this Oakland, California based band wrote some of the best blackened doom/crust this writer has heard in a long time, all topped off by a unique visual identity courtesy of the album art by bass player and vocalist Kelly Nelson that went a long way towards informing a potential listener what might lie in store for them. In fact, the cover art of their full length album is what initially drew me to listen to them in the first place.