Úlfur – Arborescence

No genre has experienced a more distinct shift in its cultural purpose than classical music. What was once the sole form of musical expression in Western culture has been largely relegated to specific roles in society. Modern classical certainly hasn’t lost any of its esteem, but in terms of popular…

Chaos Moon – Eschaton Mémoire

Chaos Moon’s fourth full-length, Eschaton Mémoire swarms with a dense black metal cascade, sweeping and overwhelming in the tide of tremolo and crush of percussion surging through it. For all its fury, however, Eschaton Mémoire can also collapse into itself — a victim of its own density when the massive drums play over the music instead of with it. When the formula works, however, Eschaton Mémoire is enveloping, chaotic, and furious — and when it doesn’t, all that sound and fury melds into forgettable background noise, signifying nothing.

Love Letter – Iron Maiden’s Powerslave

The year is 1984 and Iron Maiden are in an interesting position. Hot off the tails of two great releases and their first major tour, the band are starting to feel the pressures and joys of success at the same time. This is a crucible in which many bands have faltered, unable to reproduce the original sound which garnered them their first modicums of recognition. Line-ups shake, creative differences being to tear at the structure of the sound, as each member brings forth their own vision as to what the future should contain. In this situation, there were many divergent paths down which Iron Maiden’s story could have gone; they had already faced several major line-up changes and their future was anything but secure. They could have easily broken up or lost track of what made their first albums work.

But, instead, they made Powerslave.