Loincloth – Psalm of the Morbid Whore

Loincloth are an interesting group, one that meshes together various elements from realms of metal but keeps a very distinct sound of sludgy, crushing, and almost atonal instrumental metal. Their records sit nice and snuggly on their Southern Lord label, baring resemblance to the general dark ambiance and heavy production that bring together other artists in this territory. Not only do they have their sound up to scratch, but they even get quite progressive within their sound, employing left-field rhythms and grooves that are extremely math-core inspired and really grab you and keep you engaged. This band have so much going for them, and they truly showcase what it means to do a lot with a little. Not to mention I absolutely love that I can put an image to this music of three shirtless, bearded guys in a claustrophobic room, jamming intensely while getting lost in the power of the riff. But yet, while this record is a fun experience at first, there’s some qualities to it that need some workshopping because this release wears pretty thin, pretty fast.

All The Heavy Lifting – Your Heavy Blog Playlist

Lo’ and behold, All the Heavy Lifting is here to save the day. First off, the name: it’s just cool. We don’t even particularly like that track (not many of us are fans of The Hunter, though some to less…extravagant degrees than others). Secondly, this is a Spotify playlist which will take the place of the space dedicated to the Editors’ Picks playlist. If you don’t know where that is, scroll down and look to the left, under the popular posts. Thirdly, this list will be updated every two weeks with selections made by the staff members themselves, two per staff member. It won’t have the names of those who picked them though and there are no restrictions, genre or chronological. Each staff member can simply pick two tracks and they go on the list.

Wave // Breaker – Robots With Rayguns

Synthwave is, in many respects, a hard musical genre to nail down and many disagree as to what exactly categorizes any particular act as such beyond the simple utilization of synthesizers. While most might immediately conclude that it involves imitating the sounds of the 1980s, there are those who blur that decade divide and bring in influences from the 1990s as well. Such is the case regarding Robots With Rayguns, an act which has been in the scene for quite a number of years now, who describes themselves as being “inspired by 80s and 90s electro, breakbeat, and RnB.” Indeed, with catchy beats and a healthy dose of vocal sampling, one gets the sense that their music would have been right at home in a dance club from that era or featured quite prominently on MTV alongside La Bouche and C+C Music Factory.