Igorrr – Savage Sinusoid

Have you ever imagined what an asylum in Transylvania would sound like? Frankenstein’s monster flailing and frothing in rage, mummies and ghouls of all shapes and sizes writhing in demented ecstasy while Count Dracula himself glides through these morbid halls, singing operatically to his imprisoned comrades in terror? No? Well, how about a gigantic war between Lucky Charms and Count Chocula, complete with deadly rainbow beams and molten streams of chocolate lava? Never imagined that either? Well, surely you’ve given a thorough mental examination to the notion of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s The Phantom of the Opera undergoing an epic mash-up with Stephen Sondheim’s Sweeney Todd and Gilbert and Sullivan’s The Pirates of Penzance. No to this as well? Well I don’t blame you. That shit is bananas. But after hearing Igorrr’s latest batch of fresh hell Savage Sinusoid, such pairings may make more sense. Because this amorphous beast of a record sounds simultaneously like all of these things while also sounding like exactly none of them.

EXCLUSIVE PREMIERE: Dream With Lör “In Forgotten Sleep”

I’m here today, regardless of what the intro paragraph above might say, to premiere a track from an album which is innovation writ large. Lör’s upcoming “In Forgotten Sleep (which will see release on August 11th) not only innovates but also does it in a genre which is often known for its progressive attitudes or its contemporary relevance. I’m talking, of course, about power metal, a genre that’s perhaps the most calcified of all metal sub-genres. The last album I can recall that did anything fresh with it was Elvenking’s The Pagan Manifesto or perhaps Heid’s Alba. However, Lör do not seem content with letting that stay that way, as the title track streaming below will more than attest to that. Head on over there now for your listen and let’s meet after for a brief discussion on how Lör is dragging the genre, kicking and screaming, into the future.

Riffs from the Crypt — Antichrist

Far, far off, on the left hand path of the great metal graveyard, lies an inverted cross bearing the name of Antichrist. (Not to be confused with the seven other Antichrists listed on MA — it’s a busy job, apparently.) The band was woefully short-lived, surviving only for only three years after their 1983 release of Slaughter in Hell. Despite their short career, Antichrist has one of the oldest and most decrepit tombstones in the entire black metal necropolis. Antichrist had all the anti-Christian verve and groundbreaking ferocity of Venom, but with an added flair for catchy songwriting that should have propelled them to the fore of proto black metal.