DispersE – Foreword

Kraków’s DispersE made quite a name for themselves in 2013 with debut album Living Mirrors. The touted djent band made waves with their ebbing and flowing foray into progressive metal, combining soulful guitar licks with masterful jazz shuffles overlaid by catchy, playful grooves that dig their hooks into you and…

The Final Years: A Retrospective Of Miles Davis’s Last Albums (Part 2)

If there was one word to ultimately describe Miles Davis’s final handful of recordings, it would be “contentious”. While Davis was never too far away from controversy throughout his entire career, with a great number of his releases not finding proper reception until years after their release, this period of his life perhaps represented more of a disappointment by fans than any other. He’d been able to prove himself to be capable of serious experimentation with albums like Bitches Brew and On The Corner; one could only expect fans to be disappointed with the supposed lack of innovation found on The Man With The Horn.

Riffs from the Crypt – The Norway Rocks Split

Welcome back to Riffs from the Crypt! Today, we’re disinterring a mass grave. In 1988, Norway’s Angel Records released a five-band split called Norway Rocks, featuring Anesthesia, Manitou, Shellshock, Get Lost, and Thunderdome. The quality of the tracks featured here is outstanding, particularly the contributions from Anesthesia and Manitou. But alas, not every song could be rescued from their Norwegian tomb: both songs from Get Lost have permanently gotten themselves lost, and Shellshock’s second effort appears to have been obliterated. What is left, then, is seven tracks of speed/thrash/power metal intensity, full of tapping solos, tremolo riffs, and headbanging choruses that deserve a second chance in the light.

Hey! Listen to Mirrors!

In the spirit of Rick James, nostalgia is a helluva drug. Each of us has our poison. Movies from our childhood, specific foods, sights or smells that bring us back to a different, seemingly simpler time. Even our politics can (unfortunately) be influenced by our individual or collective sense of nostalgia. But this piece isn’t about that. Mainly, it’s about metalcore. Of all musical stylings, there is perhaps none that bring me back to my formative years of musical development more than this sub-genre. Though I do not find myself listening to metalcore very frequently in my current album rotation, I will occasionally stumble upon an album, single, or EP that scratches that nostalgia itch. Mirrors’ debut EP Fools Paradise does just that.