Oracles – Miserycorde

For anyone aware of System Divide, their splitting up was probably devastating news. The formula combining a watered down version of Aborted with female vocals worked very well, but the band had to part ways with singer Miri due to her and co-vocalist Sven’s divorce. As such, System Divide was more. Enter Sanna Salou of Dimlight and Mendel Bij de Leij. It’s no secret that Mendel joining Aborted gave the band a breath of fresh air and carried them to the next level, and with Sanna being drafted to replace Miri, System Divide was reborn as Oracles. With Mendel’s playing and Sanna’s dramatic range, System Divide 2.0 is much more than its predecessor, surpassing even Aborted. Unsurprisingly, their debut album Miserycorde is nothing short of awesome.

Infinite Density – Recollapse of the Universe

Another month, another Ne Obliviscaris side project. Just a few short months after Vipassi released their amazing debut EP Śūnyatā, multi-instrumentalist Brendan Brown, best known as the bass player in the aforementioned bands, has put the finishing touches on the debut LP of his solo project Infinite Density. A staggering nine years in the making, this album saw Brown compose and track each instrument. As mentioned in his initial album announcement, one reason for the length of time taken in releasing this record is because Brown has spent much of that time honing his guitar skills to a level where he could actually play the songs he had written. That moment is finally upon us as he enlists Ben Boyle (Hadal Maw, A Million Dead Birds Laughing, Vipassi) on vocals to release a technical death metal album in the vein of acclaimed acts such as Wormed and Inanimate Existence.

No Heroes in New England // Week of 7/17/16

With bands like Trap Them, Jerry’s Kids, and Converge all hailing from the northeast coast, it’s unsurprising to see why hardcore is a term almost synonymous with New England. But it didn’t always start out like that; due to the efforts of punk zines and record stores like Newbury Comics (who almost single-handedly birthed Boston Hardcore), angry music has been able thrive and blossom.

Hey! Listen to The Hsu-nami!

I’ll admit it. When it comes to the metal and instrumental music I listen to, I often tend to gravitate towards the serious, complex, and more cerebral side of things without taking into serious consideration something as basic as whether it’s actually fun to listen to. Not that the music I like isn’t fun or enjoyable at all, but sometimes I take for granted that something can be heavy and well-executed without requiring many listens just to unlock its secrets. Occasionally I’ll hear a band or piece of music that reminds me of this though, that can just take me on a fun ride for a while without requiring too much mental processing power but that still has more than enough going on to keep my attention.