Muscle And Marrow – Love

Often times, music tells an unintentional story. There are moments, little as they are, that bring forth a story that might have been previously unknown. When those little moments come out, an album can go beyond its normal range and encompass something larger, grander than it was before. Muscle And Marrow frontwoman Kira Clark suffered a loss in the family during the writing of their new album, titled Love, and it shows through their music. However, there is a deeper story that goes beyond just the guitars and drums that invade this record. However, are these moments justified, and if so, why aren’t they everywhere? It’s these questions that require a deeper exploration of Love and all of its intricacies.

Sacred Geometry – Mapping Metal’s Connection With the New Age

A month or so ago, I wrote a post titled “The Occult in Modern Day Metal”. In it, underneath countless of apologies for the simplifications I was about to present the readers, I took a brief look at how the occult has lent words, images, ideas and themes to the metal genre. Charting three main movements, I attempted to offer an initial direction for asking questions, a jumping point for something much more extensive. Perhaps where I’d left the most gaps was with the last part; the post was getting long, the hours were getting late and the subject matter was growing more complex. This should come as no surprise to those versed in the source material itself (and my writing/sleeping habits, if we’re being honest). You see, that final part dealt with the New Age and its ties to progressive metal. The thing is, however, that New Age is one of the most loosely defined, scholarly debated and impossible to understand spiritual movements to have ever existed. It’s right up there with Zen Buddhism, Sufism, Swedenborg-ism (I swear that’s a real thing, you can Google it) and other obscure, esoteric belief systems.

Stepping Stone: Ministry – Psalm 69

Today, I’m going to explore an album that was a huge influence on me in high school that I haven’t listened to in some time: Ministry’s Psalm 69, released in 1992 on the Sire/Warner Bros label, and considered not only one of the best Ministry albums, but also one of the most essential industrial metal albums ever.

Hey! Listen to A Great Adventure Or Nothing!

Inbox finds are the best; 75% of these posts were spawned from albums that we just randomly received. However, they’re usually submissions that do one thing really well or that don’t have enough runtime for a full review. Neither of those is the case here; I just love this album so much by now (after hearing it nonstop for three days) that I simply couldn’t wait for a review slot to open up. OK, let’s backtrack. A Great Adventure Or Nothing (named for the famous Hellen Keller quote) is a one man project from Canada. Nic Sauve, the man behind the music, produces this enchanting blend between post-rock, djent, progressive music and electronics. His debut, self titled release is nothing short of an achievement; it goes so many places and yet has its own identity. It’s really a wild ride, so let’s jump to the music and then meet back for some commentary.