Omnihility – Dominion of Misery

Dominion of Misery’s intro track, appropriately entitled “Intro”, is rather minimal and eerie until a haunting organ line kicks in, the execution somewhat reminiscent of Spawn of Possession’s “Inception” off of 2006 record Noctambulant. The similarities don’t end there — for first-time listeners, both tracks are fairly inoffensive past their dark overall tone, and both give little to no hints whatsoever of the chaos that is to ensue. Instead, the only difference is in the nature of the chaos that is to follow: whereas Spawn’s sound is all about counterpoint-based technicality, Omnihility’s modus operandi is to work entirely at relentless, breakneck speeds, pounding the listener’s head to a pulp with an onslaught of riffs.

Progress, Erase, Improve? The Case For Progressive Death Metal

My fingers itch to start this article with yet another semi-apologetic defense of the use of sub-genres but I’ll resist that urge. By now, I’m sure most of you are aware of the way I approach such things and why I find them useful. If you’re not, head on over to my Taxonomy of Progressive Metal piece to get a good idea. Funnily enough (or not) we start here as well from Progressive Metal; in this case, we’re going to take a look at a vanishing category, a branch in the extensive history of the genre that, somehow, disappeared. That category is progressive death, a style which first flourished in the mid 90’s but was then swept away in favor of both revisionism and the laziness that permeates most human interactions. Instead of retaining its clearly distinct and unique attributes and standing out as another pillar within metal, it was somehow sublimated, swallowed into a category with which it had a few conjoining points, consumed like in a weird osmosis.

Jørgen Munkeby of SHINING’s Guide To Playing Sax In Metal

When I wrote my article on incorporating sax into metal a few weeks ago, I was not subtle in my praise for the man and the machine known as Jørgen Munkeby. As the individual behind Shining and the player responsible for so many of modern metal’s great sax solos, it would be near impossible to get far in discussing the instrument’s use in the format without landing squarely on him. So I was just a little bit more than flattered when Jørgen shared the post himself and praised it. I figured that would be the end of it, but I was wrong in the best possible way, because Jørgen took this whole thing one step further and contacted us out of the blue with a list of seven excellent tips he feels are crucial to any aspiring sax player who wants to doot some brutal-sounding shit.