Toothgrinder – Nocturnal Masquerade

Genres can really only be so much on their own: even with metal, where there’s microgenres within subgenres within larger subgenres within genres, there’s still only so much that can be achieved by sticking within one certain area and refusing to branch out. It’s why so many bands within metal opt to either bring multiple genres together into a much more diverse combination, a la Agalloch’s combination of dark folk, doom, and post-black metal, or to evolve and switch from one genre to another, such as The Contortionist’s transformation from deathcore to progressive metal. Never ones to stifle their own creativity, metal musicians constantly are expanding and adding new elements into their toolkit, either by way of growing said kit or by switching out some of the older appliances within.

Oranssi Pazuzu – Värähtelijä

The more complex genres of music each have their own trick. With progressive it’s melding groove into technicality, being very careful not to lose emotional impact within grand ideas. With experimental or avant-garde music it’s to give the listeners some sort of cipher, a way to approach and translate the music they’re hearing. With the complex genres that live in the feedback, in repetition or in slow, considering movements, it is to have a core. A center must be found, a place to which you return with your music when the going gets rough, when the ears ache from the overwhelming oscillations of ponderous instruments.

Half-Life — The Dillinger Escape Plan

Before writing this, I watched The Dillinger Escape Plan perform “Prancer” live at the 2013 Golden God Awards, where, about halfway into the song, Greg Puciato cuts his head, yet performs, blood just streaming down his face, and finishes the song, even smashing a guitar against the huge wall of Orange Amps in the process. I had seen this video before—a lot of people have—but while I watched it this time, I realized how symbolic this was of the Dillinger Escape Plan as a whole. Ben Weinman and company don’t give a shit what anyone else thinks about their music, and are prepared to do what they need to do to make their music. And it shows, as there really isn’t a bad Dillinger Escape Plan album—they’re all solid in their own, unique ways.

The Anatomy Of: Gods of Eden

Welcome to our artist-written feature on Heavy Blog, “The Anatomy Of”. Taken from the Between The Buried And Me album of the same name — in which the band pays tribute to the artists and bands that they feel have most inspired their songwriting — it’s a feature in which we…